Air Pistols

Umarex Colt Peacemaker Review

Special thanks to Harwood W. Loomis at The M1911 Pistols Organization (www.M1911.org).

Remember the Lone Ranger? Return with us now to those thrilling days of yesteryear, and look at one of the newest CO2-powered BB guns offered by Umarex USA, under license from Colt. This is the Colt Peacemaker .177, an incredibly accurately detailed (and fun!) reproduction of a Colt Peacemaker Model from the late 1800s. This is, without a doubt, the most accurate Peacemaker reproduction I’ve ever seen in a BB gun. It looks, feels and acts real.

The level of detail and authenticity is astonishing, carrying through the entire gun. Small details throughout, tell you this is a Colt Peacemaker.

The CO2 cartridge is contained in the grip frame. The left side panel pops off, revealing space for the gas canister in the area where the hammer spring would be in a real revolver. The canister is locked into place by a set screw under the grip frame. A hex key is built into the removable grip panel.

The Peacemaker's "bullets"

The Peacemaker’s “bullets”

Now for the fun part. Air gun revolvers typically use a small, pinwheel-like disk, with holes for loading the pellets. The disk is then dropped into the gun to shoot. It works, but it doesn’t look or act much like a real revolver. The Peacemaker is different. Rather than load pellets or BBs into a tiny disk, the Peacemaker uses realistic-looking bullets with a hole running length-wise. The center hole contains a rubber sleeve sized to hold a BB that’s inserted into the back end. The bullets are loaded into the cylinder, just like the Lone Ranger’s silver bullets. It just doesn’t get more authentic than this.

Between the realistic action and the weight and balance of the all-metal frame, there’s enough six-gun here to “fill yer hand, Pardner” and have fun plinking. The only problem is that you’ll likely want a lot of extra “bullets”, and they are so popular that it’s not easy to buy spares.

The Peacemaker has a manual safety. It’s inconspicuously located under the frame, just ahead of the trigger guard. It’s easily accessed and used, yet it’s out of the way until you need it.

The Colt Peacemaker

The Colt Peacemaker

Shooting the Peacemaker is a joy—just like playing cowboys and Indians like us older kids did when we were young. The trigger pull is light and crisp, and because it’s a single action revolver there is little trigger movement. BBs have plenty of power to punch through soda cans, and the Peacemaker is plenty accurate for an afternoon of backyard plinking. The Colt/Umarex Peacemaker is in a class by itself; there is nothing even remotely like it on the market today.

Umarex delivers a different kind of Snake Gun – The BB cartridge-loading Colt Python

A legendary Colt revolver returns with the new Python chambered in .177 caliber. The Colt authorized Umarex wheelgun is a near perfect copy of the fabled .357 magnum revolver introduced in 1955. (Shown with Galco Colt Python thumb break holster)
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By Dennis Adler

Collectors call them “snake guns,” Pythons, Diamondbacks, Cobras, Anacondas, King Cobras, etc. Colt once had an entire lineup of famous double action revolvers named after snakes, and each and every one, in its own right, has become collectible, some more than others. At the top of the order was the Colt Python. Back in the 1950s and well into the late 20th century revolvers were king among law enforcement sidearms, and one of the most popular was the Colt Python .357 magnum revolver, introduced in 1955.

Significant design

The .357 Magnum Colt Python was one of two significant revolvers introduced in 1955, making it a very memorable year for Colt. The other was the second generation Single Action Army. The Python was a superbly designed and handcrafted gun, harder to manufacturer because it was built to a standard that only Colt could live up to; Pythons took longer to make than any other production pistol at the time because each was hand fitted and hand polished to perfection. And they were unmistakable for any other revolver, bold in shape with a full length bull barrel, fully shrouded ejector rod and full length stippled vent rib. The grips were big and distinctively shaped to provide a firm hold on the heavy recoiling .357 magnum, which came with a standard 6-inch barrel. An optional 4-inch barrel (popular with law enforcement) was also offered, a short-lived 3-inch barrel (Combat Python), long 8-inch target barrel length, and the very desirable compact model with a 2½-inch barrel and smaller Colt Service grips for easier concealment. Add the standard fully adjustable white-outline rear sight, a 1/8-inch front ramp with red inset, handsome Colt Royal blue finish or high polish nickel, and you had guns with instant appeal. Built like a target pistol the Pythons came with a distinctive wide spur checkered hammer and grooved, curved trigger. Overall weight for the standard 6-inch model was 44 ounces, 41 ounces with the 4-inch barrel.

Used by the California Highway Patrol, Colorado and Georgia State Police, and Florida Highway Patrol, among others, the Python’s remained popular with civilians and law enforcement alike in the decades leading up to the transition to semi-autos in the 1980s. By the 1990s high capacity semi-autos sealed the fate of the revolver as a primary sidearm for the vast majority of law enforcement agencies. By the early 21st century the Python and all Colt revolvers, save for the Single Action Army, were discontinued.

A little more than a year ago Umarex got together with Colt to build an authentic copy of the famed Single Action Army. To make this gun as authentic as possible the six-shot Peacemaker was literally a six-shooter using brass bullets that loaded a single steel BB into each cartridge. You loaded and unloaded the air pistol exactly as one would a real .45 Colt SAA. The concept of the BB cartridge opened the door for Umarex and Colt to take the cartridge-loading air pistol to the next level and reproduce the second most famous Colt wheelgun in history, the Python. This new double action, single action airgun is nearly identical is size, weight and operation and load their charge of six rounds either individually or with an included speed loader. (Extra cartridges and speed loaders are also available for just $22.95 a set).

The Hands-on Test

The moment you pick up the Colt Python airgun you have a sense of authenticity in their weight, balance, and very familiar operation. The guns even fit existing Colt Python holsters like the Galco thumb break belt holster shown. With a very modest suggested retail of $149.99 the Pythons are available in a deep matte blued black or nickel (actually chrome) finish with authentic wood grained or black checkered plastic grips. (The nickel chrome versions are a Pyramyd Air exclusive).

The BB-cartridge loading six-shooters weigh in at 39.4 ounces (empty) just 4.6 ounces less than a real Python with 6-inch barrel. The double action functions smoothly with a double action trigger pull averaging 10 lbs. 11 oz. and 6 lbs. 7 oz. single action. The wide notch rear sight is adjustable for elevation and windage with a serrated ramped front sight for easy target acquisition. It is a hand-filling revolver, just like the original .357 Magnum models.

At a glance the Umarex/Colt Python air pistols look incredibly accurate, and they are for the most part, but there are some noteworthy differences aside from what comes out the barrel. For one, there is an important and discretely placed serrated manual safety lever at the base of the hammer that allows the gun to be locked so the action will not function. This is a good design, especially on the blued gun where it is almost indistinguishable against the dark finish. There is a corresponding window on the right side of the frame that displays a white S or F to denote the pistol’s condition. The guns have the original “PYTHON .357” and “.357 MAGNUM CTG” markings on the left side of the barrel and the Rampant Colt on the frame just below the cylinder release.

Unlike many CO2 powered revolvers the Python does not require removing a grip panel to insert the 12 gr. cartridges; rather like semi-autos with interchangeable magazines, the base of the pistol grip has a recessed, threaded cover that unscrews allowing the CO2 to be inserted, and then with the cap replaced, it is turned tight with an enclosed hex head wrench to pierce the cartridge and ready the gun for firing. This keeps things looking and working more authentically since the grips are actually screwed to the frame and have Colt emblems. Now for the differences; the frame is just slightly higher to accommodate the air pistol action, the ramped front sight atop the vent rib does not have the red insert, and the rear lacks the white outline, minor details but a difference. The speed loaders are easy to use and make loading the six BB-charged rounds as close to the real thing as it gets.

For the range test I used one of the best steel BBs on the market, Hornady Black Diamond black anodized BBs. The rounds are simply pressed into the hollow point bullet nose, and you can do this quickly by placing all six cartridges into the speed loader (just seat the cartridges and lock the release) then press the rounds into a tin holding a quantity of BBs. They find the hollow point openings and with a little downward pressure are loaded all at once and ready for the cylinder drop. Just make sure they are seated all the way in.

With the 6-inch barrel, excellent sights, an average velocity of 400 fps, and light, crisp, single action trigger pull, the target was moved out from the usual 21 feet used for semi-auto blowback action airguns to a more competitive 10 meters (33 feet). The test was done with the blued gun with two six round sets being discharged at a Birchwood Casey 3.75 inch circumference Big Burst orange target. The gun was consistent placing all 12 steel BBs inside the 10 and X rings with a best six measuring 1.5 inches.

Overall the Umarex Colt Pythons airguns are a great deal of fun to shoot and despite being air pistols they have a certain panache that only a Colt can deliver, even if it is only pushing a .177 caliber BB downrange. For more information visit umarexusa.com.

Umarex Airgun Review New Rifled Barrel, Pellet-firing Colt Peacemaker

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For Old West shooting fun at just pennies compared to live ammo, it's hard to beat the new Umarex pellet-firing, rifled barrel Peacemaker. Hard to tell at a glance, this Colt Single Action airgun a 5-1/2 inch barrel, loads six pellet cartridges, and handles just like a real Colt.
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In 1955 Colt re-introduced its famous 1873 Single Action Army revolver. It was a welcomed reprise of “The Gun That Won The West” and Colt has never looked back, still manufacturing the legendary Peacemaker since 1873 – with a brief hiatus caused by the demands of WWII that kept the Single Action out of the lineup until 1955.

Over the decades there have been many variations of the Peacemaker but never a BB cartridge loading CO2 model, that is until Colt and Umarex teamed up to build an authentic .177 caliber Single Action Army in 2015. The gun is accurate in almost every detail, right down to the Colt patent dates and Rampant Colt emblem on the left side of frame. When I first saw this air pistol last year I was not only amazed at the engineering that had gone into making this all-metal six-shooter, but how all of the famous Colt features had been incorporated right down to the loading gate, ejector housing, hammer, triggerguard, and grip contours. It’s as close to the real deal as you can get without loading .45 Colt cartridges.

At about 33 ounces it’s a little lighter than a .45 Caliber 5-1/2 inch barrel length Colt Peacemaker, but the Colt Umarex SAA has the same looks except for the addition of a manual safety discretely hidden under the fame and just forward of the triggerguard. The nickel version is a dandy of a gun that will open up whole new avenues for Cowboy Action Shooters to practice quick draw and shooting from the hip, pistol handling and target shooting at close range without the expense or cleanup of black powder or smokeless powder .45 Colt rounds or wax bullets. Dimensionally, the BB gun is dead on. The rebounding hammer feels different, lighter, as there is no actual Colt-style mainspring and the hammer sits slightly back from the frame at rest. Cocking the gun follows normal single action operation by rotating the cylinder to the next chamber. There is a CO2 capsule stored inside the grip to power the .177 pellet downrange at an average of 410 feet per second. Unlike some of the BB cartridges in use, the Colt models load the BB or pellet into the base of the cartridge where the primer would usually go. The brass BB and silver pellet cartridges authentic, though not .45 Colt in size, more like a .32-20 Winchester round, which Single Actions were chambered for beginning in 1884. The gun fits any SAA holster, and even has to be oiled and cleaned (moderately after every 1,000 rounds) with an available Umarex cleaning kit.

Raising the bar

The new nickel finished SAA pellet model comes fitted with black panel grips and a Colt Peacemaker Rampant Colt inset emblem. In all respects other than what comes out of the recessed .45 Colt muzzle, the pellet model looks identical to the .177 caliber BB models, which is to say very much like a nickel plated smokeless powder frame Colt Single Action Army revolver design. The 1892 smokeless powder frame design introduced the transverse cylinder latch under the barrel to release the cylinder pin for disassembly.

Skinning the no-smoke wagon

This is one sharp looking revolver and with the 5-1/2 inch barrel it fits any Colt SAA holster from hand tooled belt holsters to shoulder rigs. Just as in the Old West, holsters were a matter of choice or more often what was available at the gun shop or local saddlery. To test the new pellet model Umarex Colt Peacemaker I dropped it into a one-off copy of a famous fringed holster pictured in the book Packing Iron. The copy of the holster was handmade by Javier Garcia of .45Maker (801-628-7219). To do a few Cowboy Action shooting drills with the pellet gun I set up silhouette targets at the SASS (Single Action Shooting Society) pistol distance of 10 yards and fired Duelist style, which is one handed. A CO2 pellet gun with a rifled barrel is definitely good out to 10 yards. I also set up a few tin cans to do some Old West target shooting!

Ammo choice was RWS Meisterkugeln, a traditional 4.5mm wad cutter target grade pellet. Purchasing at least a dozen extra cartridges is a good idea for faster reloading. Pellet cartridges run around $10 for a set of six.

Taking my best gunfighter stance I did a quick draw for the first six shots just to see where I was hitting on the silhouette target. I put six pellets into the center of the target. Going to aimed shots six rounds grouped in the 10 and X rings at 1.75 inches. I repeated this a few more times with average six round groups measuring under 2-inches. Then I went after the tin cans, knocking them down in order and “kicking the cans”around the top of an old whiskey barrel (see the accompanying video gun test).

You can also practice drawing, re-holstering, and a little fancy gun handling with the Umarex Colt Peacemaker and shoot to your heart’s content for just pennies. The nickel finished, rifled barrel six-shooter has a suggested retail of just $179. 99. For more information visit umarexusa.com.

by Dennis Adler

Umarex Colt Commander Review

Special thanks to Harwood W. Loomis at The M1911 Pistols Organization (www.M1911.org).

The new Colt/Umarex Commander 1911 model is a CO2-powered, (simulated) blowback version of the M1911A1. This is the most accurate reproduction of an M1911A1 I have ever seen in a BB gun. It looks and feels real, and it acts real. The experience of shooting this pistol is amazing – and I shot 1911s when I was in the Army.

Colt/Umarex Commander 1911

Colt/Umarex Commander 1911

The level of authenticity is astonishing. One of my pet peeves is fake 1911 air pistols that have swinging triggers. In this one, the trigger slides straight back, just like it should. The slide stop works. It not only swings up and down, it also locks the slide back after the last shot has been fired. The grip safety not only moves, it also functions as it should.

The thumb safety is functional. Like on a real 1911, it can’t be raised unless the hammer is cocked. As is common on air guns, it has markings for “SAFE” and “FIRE” positions. I can live with that if it gets us a properly functional thumb safety.

The barrel is smooth-bore. A smooth-bore barrel simply can’t produce the accuracy of a rifled barrel. But this is a plinking handgun, so accuracy isn’t critical. The advantage is that it shoots readily-available, steel BBs.

The specifications list the barrel length as 4.50 inches, yet the pistol is the size of a 5-inch M1911A1. This is because the muzzle of the .177-inch barrel is set back a half inch from the apparent muzzle at the front of the slide, for a .45 caliber barrel effect. The “muzzle” even has six ribs on the inside to look like the rifling in a real gun barrel.

CO2 and magazine occupy full magazine well.

CO2 and magazine occupy full magazine well.

What makes the new Colt/Umarex Commander an excellent training aid is that so much of the real 1911 manual of arms remains the same on this reproduction. The Commander is loaded using a magazine that occupies the full magazine well in the frame. The CO2 cartridge is loaded into the magazine, with the BBs, and the pistol is loaded by inserting the magazine and racking the slide. Just like in real life.

The pistol is made of metal, so its weight and balance are very close to those of a real 1911.

The trigger was light, with a bit of creep. The Commander uses some of the gas energy to cycle the slide, resulting in a CO2 air pistol that feels more like shooting a .22 caliber rimfire pistol than it does an air gun.

An Airgunner Birthday Party

Looking to have a great time outdoors with your kids (or anyone for that matter)? Then pull out the airguns because that’s exactly what Tim from Airgun Hobbyist did. Tim threw quite the birthday party for his 14 year-old son, Ben, at their North Carolina home. The party lasted over four hours and saw 1000 pellets and BBs fired downrange with 30 different airguns and hundreds of different targets to choose from.

The family set up hundreds of targets in their backyard.

The family set up hundreds of targets in their backyard.

Targets

They started by preparing their home made range with some painted targets consisting of over 200 empty CO2 cartridges, 50 vegetable cans, dozens of soda cans, 80 water balloons, ice targets and a few rotten eggs. They also set up a few commercial targets including the center piece, the Right Now Range that held Shatter Blast targets, soda cans and some large bulls eye targets.

Safety First

The targets were placed a minimum of 30 feet away from the firing line and each guest was given safety glasses to wear in case of a ricochet and were of course instructed on safety rules. Backstops were also used behind the targets to protect any wildlife they may have been wandering through.

They offered an impressive array of airguns to shoot as well.

They offered an impressive array of airguns to shoot as well.

The Airguns

There were many Umarex airguns at this little party including the Colt Peacemaker, Colt Commander, Colt Python, Walther PPQ, Walther PPS, Walther CP88, a S&W 586 and a Makarov. The Umarex Fusion took down quite a few long range targets and was fired for a fairly long time without needing to replace the CO2.
The Umarex Steel Force and the M712 weren’t as lucky though. The CO2 was constantly being replaced because everyone wanted to shoot them! The M712 was the favorite in full auto mode, and the Steel Force was another favorite with its six round burst mode.
The biggest hit was the Walther Lever Action western style rifle, which felt right at home in this shooting gallery style range. The Umarex Morph 3X was another favorite with its ability to “morph”. It made a great choice for shooters of all sizes.

Aftermath

Everyone left with a smile on their face and comments such as “We should do this more often!” The family also got to enjoy some private shooting time knocking down the remaining targets the next day before clean up.